Can an Association Limit Your Right to Bear Arms?

Can an association restrict an individual’s right to bear arms? The answer, though nuanced, is likely in the affirmative. An association’s board has wide authority under the governing documents to restrict everything from paint color to holiday decorations, as long as the action is reasonable. See, e.g., Allnutt v High Court of Foresters, 62 Mich 110, 28 NW 802 (1886); […]

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Legal Update: Slip and Fall on Condominium Premises

Over the last four years, there have been numerous Michigan Court of Appeals decisions addressing slip and falls on the Condominium Premises. Given that Michigan’s weather is turning colder by the day, the risk of significant personal harm on slippery snow and ice only increases. As a continuation in this series regarding slip and falls on the Condominium Premises in […]

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Can you terminate a condominium under the Michigan Condominium Act?

The Michigan Condominium Act, MCL 559.101, et seq., contains specific procedures for the termination of a condominium. If a developer has not sold any condominium units, MCL 559.150 permits the developer to unilaterally terminate a condominium project. If the developer has sold units, MCL 559.151 sets forth the voting process for terminating a condominium project. This article will discuss the […]

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MCL 559.147: How to handle unauthorized co-owner modifications to the common elements

Michigan condominium associations are often forced to deal with co-owners who are unfamiliar with condominium living, or in some instances, are not even aware that they live in a condominium that is governed by a master deed, bylaws or rules in regulations. As a result, it is not uncommon for a co-owner to unilaterally make modifications to the general common elements […]

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The Difference Between General and Limited Common Elements in Traditional and Site Condominiums in Michigan

In Michigan, condominiums consist of either units or common elements. Common elements are further subdivided into two categories: general common elements and limited common elements. Under most Michigan condominium documents, the difference between general common elements and limited common elements is important to determine who is responsible for maintaining, repairing and replacing damage to various areas of the condominium, which […]

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Was your condominium properly expanded under the Michigan Condominium Act?

In Michigan, when a developer creates a condominium, the developer is required to record a master deed. Pursuant to MCL 559.108, the master deed and condominium subdivision plan must identify the total number of units in the project and assign a percentage of value to each unit.  However, the initial configuration of the condominium is not set in stone.  MCL […]

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