Can an Association Limit Your Right to Bear Arms?

Can an association restrict an individual’s right to bear arms? The answer, though nuanced, is likely in the affirmative. An association’s board has wide authority under the governing documents to restrict everything from paint color to holiday decorations, as long as the action is reasonable. See, e.g., Allnutt v High Court of Foresters, 62 Mich 110, 28 NW 802 (1886); […]

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Should your HOA install license plate cameras?

It is estimated that at least 400,000 neighborhoods throughout the United States have installed automated license plate readers.  Automated license plate readers are high-speed cameras that are mounted on street poles, streetlights, entrances, gatehouses or other areas in which automobiles will enter or exit a condominium or subdivision. Automated license plate readers can be an important safety tool as it […]

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Michigan Court of Appeals rules that co-owner is responsible for pre-existing bylaw violations after purchasing condominium unit

Kevin Hirzel, Brandan Hallaq and Kayleigh Long of Hirzel Law, PLC represented the Fox Pointe Association in this case. In Fox Pointe Association v Ryal, unpublished opinion of the Court of Appeals, issued July 23, 2019 (Docket No. 344232), the Michigan Court of Appeals held that a co-owner was responsible for the pre-existing bylaw violations of a prior co-owner after […]

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MCL 559.148: How to relocate unit boundaries under the Michigan Condominium Act

Michigan condominium associations and co-owners should be aware that the boundaries of condominium units are not necessarily fixed and may be changed provided that certain requirements are satisfied under the Michigan Condominium Act, MCL 559.101, et seq.  By way of example, a single co-owner may purchase adjoining condominium units in a traditional attached condominium and desire to relocate the boundaries […]

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The Difference Between General and Limited Common Elements in Traditional and Site Condominiums in Michigan

In Michigan, condominiums consist of either units or common elements. Common elements are further subdivided into two categories: general common elements and limited common elements. Under most Michigan condominium documents, the difference between general common elements and limited common elements is important to determine who is responsible for maintaining, repairing and replacing damage to various areas of the condominium, which […]

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Michigan Court of Appeals rules that Condominium Rules and Regulations cannot supersede the Master Deed and Bylaws

In The Mt. Vernon Park Association v Chantelle Clark, Michigan Court of Appeals Docket No. 323445 (December 29, 2015) (Unpublished) and The Mt. Vernon Park Association v Patricia Williams, Michigan Court of Appeals Docket No. 323482 (December 29, 2015) (Unpublished), the Michigan Court of Appeals held that a Michigan Condominium Association could not create rules and regulations that were inconsistent […]

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